Keep Your Vision Clear with the Driller’s Dust Bowl

There’s no better way to get the upper hand in an old-fashion fist fight than to throw a handful of dust, dirt, or mud in the other guys face. While he’s blinded, it’s your turn to the turn the tables and get the upper hand. However, the job site is no place to get a face full of dust, dirt, or any other kind of debris.

We know, we know. You probably already have a good pair of protective glasses you wear on the jobsite. That’s all well and good for the nails, staples, and other debris on the jobsite. Most glasses are designed to withstand impacts more than they are simply used to keep small particles out of your eyes. If you want to ensure the safety of your eyes, the Driller’s Dust Bowl is a must! Whether you’re installing can lights or drilling wiring holes, the Driller’s Dust Bowl keeps you clean.

Eat My Dust!

The Driller’s Dust Bowl is a simple tool from Rack-A-Tiers. The bowl can be applied to the end of any drill or hole saw and requires no adjustments to fit your existing setups. The flexible bowl compresses itself against the work surface, be it wood, drywall, or even concrete. From there, it traps all the dust and debris as you drill.

Rather than allowing all that dust to rain down on your face, and making your co-workers eat your dust, the bowl traps it all. When you’re done with each individual hole, simply dump the dust onto the ground or into the trash. It’s as simple as that. The benefits to you are immense. First and foremost, you can keep the jobsite clean as you go. The dust bowl can actually save you time on clean up at the end of the day!

More importantly, the Driller’s Dust Bowl can protect your eyes and your health in general. There are a lot of particles floating around in dust on the common jobsite. If you think your eyes are the only possible target, think again.

Why the Dust Bowl Matters

There is increasing evidence that dust on jobsites across North America poses a health risk. Whether you’re sawing concrete, drilling through wood studs, or cutting into drywall, you’re creating dust. The more of that dust floating around in the air, the more likely you are to suffer physically as a result.

According to HP Products, the following are some of the most common dust irritations/conditions on the jobsite:

  • Simple irritation: Exposure to dust results in immediate, uncomfortable irritation to your eyes, nose, throat, lungs, and skin. Eyes typically itch, water, and burn, and coughing increases.
  • Allergies/Asthma: Exposure to dust can aggravate existing allergies. Over time, it can actually lead to the development of allergies. Dust can also cause or exacerbate asthma, resulting in great physical harm.
  • Lung Disease: The worst possible outcome is the development of lung disease. Prolonged exposure to dust on the jobsite can negatively impact lung performance over time. In the worst case scenario, individuals have developed COPD and even lung cancer.

Even if you focus on just your eyes, there are plenty of threats from dust. The American Optometric Association cites data from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health that every day, 2,000 US workers sustain job-related eye injuries. The Driller’s Dust Bowl is simple, but it can help prevent these issues.

What’s So Dangerous in Dust?

The most common threat in dust is silica. Silica is Earth’s second most abundant element. You’ll find it in every concrete block, brick, mortar joint, and drywall section you cut into. Currently, silica dust threatens some 2.3 million workers in on 676,000 US jobsites.

Keep it Fresh, Get the Driller’s Dust Bowl

It’s not a cure all, but the Driller’s Dust Bowl is handy to have in your tool bag. Together with proper eyewear and other protective measures, the Driller’s Dust Bowl is an easy way to keep the air on your job site cleaner!

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