Find Yourself a Stud in a Heartbeat

Don’t worry folks, Rack-A-Tiers hasn’t turned into a dating website on you in 2017. Nope, we’re talking about finding those studs in residential and commercial construction sites instead of a, well, handsome man. The Stud Ball is a handy, simple tool from Rack-A-Tiers designed to help you quickly and easily find steel stud beams the next time you’re on the job site. Before you scoff, it might surprise you how quickly steel is being adopted for use beyond the commercial jobsite.

Those working in the commercial sector for years have been dealing with steel stud finders for decades, but only within the past few years have steel studs become more popular in residential construction as well. When those standard stud finders don’t work, you know you can trust the Stud Ball to get the job done right, every time.

Why a Steel Stud Finder?

For centuries homes have been built using timber. If you’ve worked in home construction in North America anytime in the last 50 years, you know that the vast majority of homes have been constructed since then using wooden studs and wood frames. However, steel is quietly gaining popularity in some residential projects because it creates less waste during fabrication (2% compared to 20% for lumber studs), isn’t susceptible to mold or termites, and if need be steel studs could be scrapped and reused.

Steel is no longer used exclusively in commercial construction, which means you need the right tools in your belt to tackle any job from commercial to residential. The Stud Ball is that tool!

Meet the Stud Ball

To call this tool simple and easy-to-use is an understatement. You won’t find another stud finder on the market, for wood or steel studs, that is easier to use than the Stud Ball. This product offers a protected magnetic stud finder capable of locating steel studs behind various surfaces, including drywall 1/2 or 5/8 inch thick, 3/4 inch plywood paneling, and even ceramic tiles.

The Stud Ball boasts impressive performance for such a simple tool. The 27 lbs of magnetic pull not only makes it abundantly clear when you’ve located a stud, but it also offers such strength that you might be able to hang up your tools once you’ve found the last stud in the room and enjoy your lunch break, just ask contractor Cody Metcalfe.

Every job is about speed at the end of the day. You always want to get the job done right, but life’s a little better when you get it done fast and right at the same time. We’re so confident in the past performances of the Stud Ball, we know it will help you find as many as 40 steel studs on a wall with 5/8 inch drywall in less than one minute. How’s that for efficiency?

Do You Really Need a Stud Ball?

We might be biased, but the answer is a definite yes. Standard stud finders don’t have a mechanism for detecting wood behind drywall as opposed to copper piping, electrical wiring, or metal studs. Typical stud finders help you find a wooden stud because it is capable of detecting a figure behind the drywall or paneling. What that figure is cannot be guaranteed by the stud finder you’re using.

The Stud Ball is no one-trick pony though! Just because you buy the Stud Ball doesn’t mean you’ll need a separate stud finder for wood studs. The magnet in the Stud Ball is so powerful it will “stick” even when it finds nails and screws used in the fastening of drywall. This means you’ll be able to find both steel and wooden studs with just one stud finder in your tool kit.

Stud Ball is easy-to-use, and when that ball catches and sticks to steel, you’ll know it immediately. The beauty of the Stud Ball is the surety you get when it contacts a steel stud and the speed with which you’ll get the job done. No guessing, just detecting!

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